Fracture for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 Review

Ah, futuristic shooters. We all know and love them dearly, even though some play the card a bit to repetitively. Due to how the gameplay unfolds, it makes perfect sense to go with a futuristic shooter when chalking out the gameplay mechanics of Fracture. And while this game has some painfully crippling flaws, it is the first of its kind to capitalize so heavily on terrain deformation. It may be a while before a game like this can be executed perfectly, but if this is a preview of what’s to come then I’m psyched.

Fracture is set in the US around 150 years in the future. Thankfully for our game a handy war has popped up between the east coast and the west coast, saving him the trouble of standard employment and flattening ground so a new Wal-Mart can be put in. This is where the interesting portion of the story ends as you find yourself in control of Jet Brody, a member of the Atlantic Alliance, who is set with the task to stop a general that wants to further escalate tension between the two factions. Jet Brody is really like every gruff actiony personae in these games as of late: Shallow dialog, stubble and lots of muscle.

But the story isn’t what we’re here for! We want to see the ground below is get ripped up and pulled all over the place. We want a dynamic battlefield in which to trap our foes and blast them to pieces. On this count the game succeeds quite well, the terrain deformation only giving the frame rate a hiccup or two here and there, and this is understandable as real-time terrain deformation inside of a working game system can be quite complicated to handle efficiently. The skills of the players should be player should be compatible for enjoying the video games. The passing of all the levels will be beneficial to buy LoL Lvl 30 Account for Sale from the sellers. The process should be simple and easy for the players. 

For the terrain deformation, you get the Entrencher, which is capable of raising or lowering terrain in real-time. Other weapons perform similar functions as the Entrencher, but they are more anti-personnel oriented. Some of these include the spike grenade and the vortex grenade, which are meant to deal your enemies a thick amount of pain. You also get many of the standard weapons we find in shooters: Shotguns and SMGs. But you also get a few terrain oriented guns, such as a tunneling gun that can go through covering terrain and hit enemies, or a gun that augments gravity. The game also sports some standard augmentation abilities for your character, but there’s nothing particularly innovative about this system.

Now, on to the bad: the aiming has some serious issues in this game. Often times the ray used to calculate where your shots are going is far too low, and can hit the ground beneath you many, many times when you don’t want it to. If you’re trying to make a hill for cover in a hurry, you will find yourself lifted up instead. If you’re trying to fire from cover, you’ll often find yourself hitting the cover without a way to adjust. Also aiming the grenades is rather painful, as you can control nothing except the direction and when you’re trying to release them in a hurry this can be painful. Also the AI can be rather dumb at times – while they are trained to react to cover creation, they are very weak when it comes to straight up firefighting and often they will try to clip through walls or just stand around.

Overall, the game is visually appealing, and the gamplay mechanics really have a nice ring to them. If you’re into shooters and you like experimental, extremely dynamic gameplay, then you should give this title a shot!